turkish restaurant San Diego

Call Now (619) 401-9400 Saray Restaurant offer great menu options at affordable prices in San Diego.


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Drinks and desserts | Saray Restaurants

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

 

Drinks and desserts

The traditional drink accompanying Iranian dishes is doogh, a combination of yogurt, still or carbonated water, salt, and dried mint. Other drinks include sherbets known as Sharbat and “Khak shir“. One favorite is Aab-e Havij, alternately called havij bastani, carrot juice made into an ice cream float and garnished with cinnamon, nutmeg or other spices. There are also drinks that are not served with meals. These include Sheer Moz (banana milk shake), Aab Talebi (cantaloupe juice), and Aab Hendevaneh (watermelon juice). These are commonly made in stands or kiosks in streets on summer days and on hiking trails. Aab Anaar (pomegranate juice) is also popular and has recently (2007) become popular in North America. Sekanjebin is a thick syrup made from vinegar, mint and sugar, served mixed with carbonated or plain water. It can be drunk mixed with a little rosewater or used as a dip for Romaine lettuce.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

 

Dessert dishes range from Bastani-e Za’farāni (Persian ice cream, also called Bastani-e Akbar-Mashti or Gol-o Bolbol) to faludeh (a frozen sorbet made with thin starch noodles and rosewater). Persian ice cream is flavored with saffron, rosewater, and includes chunks of heavy cream. There are also many types of sweets, divided into two categories: Shirini Tar (lit. moist sweets) and Shirini Khoshk (lit. dry sweets). The first category consists of French-inspired pastries with heavy whole milk whipped cream, glazed fruit toppings, tarts, custard-filled éclairs, and a variety of cakes. Some have an Iranian twist, such as the addition of saffron, pistachios, and walnuts. The second category consists of more traditional Iranian sweets: Shirini-e Berenji (a type of rice cookie), Shirini-e Nokhodchi (clover-shaped chickpea flour cookies), Kolouche (a large cookie usually with a walnut or fig filling), Shirini-e Keshmeshi (raisin and saffron cookies), Shirini-e Yazdi (small cakes originating from the city of Yazd), Nan-e kulukhi (a kind of large thick cookie without any filling), and others.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

 

 

 


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area Persian food – Persian cuisine San Diego

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 

 

Seafood is the most important part of Persian cuisine San Diego, but many other dishes are also featured. The most popular Persian cuisine San Diego dish is Ghalieh Mahi, a popular fish dish that is prepared with heavy spices, onions and cilantro. One of the fish used for grilled fish is locally known as mahi soboor (shad fish), a species of fish found in the Arvand river ( Arvand rood ) .

 Other Persian cuisine San Diego specialties include Ghalieh Meygu (“shrimp stew”), ashe-mohshala (a breakfast stew), sær shir (a breakfast of heavy cream), hælim (a breakfast of wheatmeal with shredded lamb), and kohbbeh (a deep-fried rice cake with ground beef filling and other spices of Arabic origin, a variant on Levantine kibbeh). Also see Persian cuisine San Diego.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 

Kateh is the traditional dish of North of Iran (Persian cuisine San Diego) and is simply Persian rice cooked in water, butter and salt until the water is fully absorbed. This method results in rice that is clumped together and is the predominant style of cooking rice in the Caspian region. Kateh is commonly eaten in other parts of Iran because of its short cooking time and easy preparation, and is prescribed widely as a natural remedy for those who are sick with the common cold or flu, and also for those suffering from stomach pains and ulcers. Some of the foods like Chegdermeh are only used in Turkmen region of Golestan Province, but many other dishes are used in all parts of Iran.

Iranian caviar and Caspian fish roes hails from that region, and is served with eggs, in frittatas (Kuku sabzi) or omelettes  Persian food San Diego. The cuisine of this region has the most affinity with other cuisines of the wider Caucasus region. Persian food San Diego

 

 


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Asian cuisine – Persian cuisine San Diego

Persian cuisine San Diego cuisine is the cuisine of the various countries and peoples of the Middle East. The cuisine of the region is diverse while having a degree of homogeneity. Some commonly used ingredients include olives and olive oil, pitas, honey, sesame seeds, dates,[4]sumac, chickpeas, mint and parsley. Some popular dishes include kibbeh and shawarma.

Cereals constitute the basis of the Persian cuisine San Diego diet, both historically and today. Wheat and rice are the major and preferred sources of staple foods. Barley is also widely used in the region and maize has became common in some areas as well. Bread is a universal staple —eaten in one form or another by all classes and groups— practically at every meal.

Butter and clarified butter (also known as samna) are, traditionally, the preferred medium of cooking. Olive oil is prevalent in the Mediterranean coastal areas. Christians use it during Lent, when meat and dairy products are excluded, and Jews use it in place of animal fats such as butter to avoid mixing meat and dairy products.

Persian cuisine San Diego,Persian Foods San Diego

Lamb and mutton have always been the favored meats of the Middle East. Pork is prohibited in both Islam and Judaism, and as such is rarely eaten in the region. Prominent among the meat preparations are grilled meats, or kebabs. Meat and vegetable stews, served with rice, bulgur, or bread, are another form of meat preparation in the region.

Vegetables and pulses are the predominant staple of the great majority of the people in the Middle East. Persian cuisine San Diego are boiled, stewed, grilled, stuffed, and cooked with meat and with rice. Among the green leaf vegetables, many varieties of cabbage, spinach, and chard are widely used. Root and bulb vegetables, such as onions and garlic, as well as carrots, turnips, and beets are equally common.

 

 


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HERE ARE THE 5 DISHES YOU SHOULD KNOW – Persian cuisine San Diego

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego  

Iran has just broken bread with the US for the first time since the Revolution of 1979, so it’s about time to learn what the hell that broken Persian cuisine San Diego bread tastes like. But before you start worrying about etiquette or customs or language (which you can learn via a podcast from that nice woman holding the food), it’s way more delicious to just learn about what’s on the plate. So here are the 5 dishes that every Persian cuisine San Diego knows and loves, so you can learn them, and make Persians want to know and love you.

Fesenjoon
Translation: None
Ingredients: Stewed pomegranate puree, ground walnuts, chopped onions, chunks of poultry or balls of ground meat.
What’s the deal: Pomegranates were a big deal in Iran long before Westerners realized they were Wonderful. The tart flavor from “the fruit of heaven” combined with savory spices creates one of the most uniquely Persian dishes in the culinary canon — a seasonal Fall and Winter dish that, when mentioned to an Iranian, will immediately make them think you know much more about their culture than you actually do.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego  

Ghormeh Sabzi
Translation: “Stewed greens”
Ingredients: Parsley, spinach, leeks, coriander, kidney beans, dried lemons, dried fenugreek leaves, turmeric-seasoned lamb or beef.
What’s the deal: Persian cuisine San Diego most widely eaten stew, this lumpy green dish is always going to be on the table of any Persian dinner party, while everyone debates whether Iranian National Team striker Reza Ghoochannejhad is overrated.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego  

Kabob
Translation: Pretty much universal for “meat”
Ingredients: Long strips of minced lamb, chicken, or beef grilled over a fire and served alongside charred tomatoes, rice sprinkled with sumac, a parsley salad, and flatbread.
What’s the deal: Persian cuisine San Diego shish you not, this is probably the most beloved dish in Iran and ranges from super-cheap street food to stuff that only the Shahs of Sunset could afford. There are a ton of different varieties where the meat is spiced differently (turmeric for kabab koobideh, saffron for kabab barg) and it’s usually accompanied by doogh (see below!) or a soda ordered by color rather than brand name, with black meaning Coke, white for Sprite, and orange for Fanta.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego  

Doogh
Translation: Roughly derives from the verb “to milk”
Ingredients: Yogurt, mint, sometimes diced cucumbers.
What’s the deal: Iranians mix yogurt into pretty much everything savory — including spaghetti and soups — and, to get even more yogurt into a meal, they guzzle glasses of doogh. The sour yogurt drink can sometimes be tough on foreign palates, which might associate the same flavors with curdled milk.

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego  

Tadeeg
Translation: “Bottom of the pot”
Ingredients: Burnt rice flavored with saffron.
What’s the deal: Iranians love burnt things. Rice is served alongside most meals, but the most coveted rice is tadeeg: the bottom crispy layer that’s slightly burnt and has soaked up much of the caramelized saffron. Iran produces 90% of the world’s saffron, which is often said to be as expensive as a “pretty girl’s kiss” — and which you can now pay for with your knowledge of Persian cuisine San Diego food.


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Persian cuisine San Diego – Saray Restaurant

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 

Most of Persian cuisine San Diego dishes are prepared with herbs, vegetables and rice along with meat, lamb, chicken or fish. The frequent use of fresh green herbs and vegetables in Persian cuisine San Diego foods made them a healthy choice for most of households around the world. The Persian cuisine San Diego cuisine or Persian cuisine San Diego cuisine refers to a styles of cooking related to Persia or modern day Iran. Iran has a long history of agriculture, and use of fresh fruit in Persian cuisine San Diego recipes is very common. 

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego
Ancient Persia has always had four seasons and that gave the huge variety to Persian cuisine San Diego cuisine from tropical foods to hot pot dishes that are most popular on a chilly winter. 
Most of these foods include: Kabab (rice with meat, a Persian cuisine San Diego Kabab), broth (lamb mixed with spice, beans and potatoes), Fesenjan (Especially duck and goose meat and birds with nuts and pomegranates paste), Stuffed Dolme (fresh grape leaves stuffed with ground beaf and herbs) and variety of vegetable stews. 

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/ (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/ (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 

 

On this website we try to modernize Persian cuisine San Diego food recipes to fit your everyday lifestyle by increasing the healthy ingredients and decreasing the time consumed making these recipes without losing the taste. Persian cuisine San Diego foods mostly contain herbs, vegetables and meat which may balance your daily value intake recommendations. Healthy diets rich in vegetables provide essential vitamins and minerals and fiber needed for good health. Research shows that consumption of fruits and vegetables can help you maintain a good health and may reduce the risk of cancer and many other diseases.


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Persian cuisine San Diego – saray restaurant

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 
 
Persian cuisine San Diego is the traditional and modern style of cooking of Iran. Situated in the Middle East and West Asia, the Iranian culinary style is unique to Iran, though has historically both influenced and has been influenced by Iran’s neighboring and conquered regions at various stages throughout its history. Specifically, these have been mutual culinary influences to and from Anatolian cuisine, Caucasian cuisine, Mesopotamian Cuisine, Levantine cuisine, Greek cuisine, Afghan Cuisine, and minor aspects from Russian cuisine. The cuisines of the Caucasus and Turkey are heavily influenced by that of Iran, due to geographical proximity, ethnic relations, shared empires, and conquerings by such as the Achaemenids, Sassanians, Seljuks, Safavids, Afsharids, Ottomans and Qajars.
 
Fresh green herbs are frequently used along with fruits such as plums, pomegranates, quince, prunes, apricots, and raisins. Typical Persian cuisine San Diego main dishes are combination of rice with meat, lamb, chicken, or fish and some onion, vegetables, nuts, and herbs. To achieve a balanced taste, characteristic Persian flavorings such as saffron, dried limes, cinnamon, and parsley are mixed delicately and used in some special dishes.
http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego
Persian cuisine San Diego includes a wide variety of foods ranging from chelow kabab (rice served with roasted meat: barg, koobideh, joojeh, shishleek, soltani, chenjeh), khoresh (stew that is served with white Iranian rice: ghormeh sabzi, gheimeh, fesenjān, and others), āsh (a thick soup: for example āsh-e anār), kuku (vegetable souffle), polo (white rice alone or with addition of meat and/or vegetables and herbs, including loobia polo, albaloo polo, sabzi polo, zereshk polo, baghali polo and others), and a diverse variety of salads, pastries, and drinks specific to different parts of Iran. The list of Persian recipes, appetizers and desserts is extensive.
http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 
Rice
It is unknown when rice (berenj in Persian) was brought to Iran from the Indian subcontinent. The use of it, at first a specialty of Safavid court cuisine, evolved by the end of the 16th century CE into a major branch of Iranian cookery.Varieties of rice in Iran include champa, rasmi, anbarbu, mowlai, sadri, khanjari, shekari, doodi, and others. Traditionally, rice was most prevalent as a major staple item in the rice growing region of northern Iran, and the homes of the wealthy, while in the rest of the country bread was the dominant staple. The varieties of rice most valued inPersian cuisine San Diego are prized for their aroma, and grow in the north of Iran.

 


Leave a comment

Persian cuisine San Diego – saray restaurant

 

http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 
 
Persian cuisine San Diego is the traditional and modern style of cooking of Iran. Situated in the Middle East and West Asia, the Iranian culinary style is unique to Iran, though has historically both influenced and has been influenced by Iran’s neighboring and conquered regions at various stages throughout its history. Specifically, these have been mutual culinary influences to and from Anatolian cuisine, Caucasian cuisine, Mesopotamian Cuisine, Levantine cuisine, Greek cuisine, Afghan Cuisine, and minor aspects from Russian cuisine. The cuisines of the Caucasus and Turkey are heavily influenced by that of Iran, due to geographical proximity, ethnic relations, shared empires, and conquerings by such as the Achaemenids, Sassanians, Seljuks, Safavids, Afsharids, Ottomans and Qajars.
 
Fresh green herbs are frequently used along with fruits such as plums, pomegranates, quince, prunes, apricots, and raisins. Typical Persian cuisine San Diego main dishes are combination of rice with meat, lamb, chicken, or fish and some onion, vegetables, nuts, and herbs. To achieve a balanced taste, characteristic Persian flavorings such as saffron, dried limes, cinnamon, and parsley are mixed delicately and used in some special dishes.
Persian cuisine San Diego includes a wide variety of foods ranging from chelow kabab (rice served with roasted meat: barg, koobideh, joojeh, shishleek, soltani, chenjeh), khoresh (stew that is served with white Iranian rice: ghormeh sabzi, gheimeh, fesenjān, and others), āsh (a thick soup: for example āsh-e anār), kuku (vegetable souffle), polo (white rice alone or with addition of meat and/or vegetables and herbs, including loobia polo, albaloo polo, sabzi polo, zereshk polo, baghali polo and others), and a diverse variety of salads, pastries, and drinks specific to different parts of Iran. The list of Persian recipes, appetizers and desserts is extensive.
http://www.sarayrestaurantsandiego.com/  (619) 401-9400 Persian cuisine San Diego 
Rice
It is unknown when rice (berenj in Persian) was brought to Iran from the Indian subcontinent. The use of it, at first a specialty of Safavid court cuisine, evolved by the end of the 16th century CE into a major branch of Iranian cookery.[5] Varieties of rice in Iran include champa, rasmi, anbarbu, mowlai, sadri, khanjari, shekari, doodi, and others. Traditionally, rice was most prevalent as a major staple item in the rice growing region of northern Iran, and the homes of the wealthy, while in the rest of the country bread was the dominant staple. The varieties of rice most valued inPersian cuisine San Diego are prized for their aroma, and grow in the north of Iran.

 

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